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SBCSC - Dumbing Down

SBCSC - Dumbing Down

Postby Happy Mom » Mon Aug 03, 2015 7:12 am

South Bend school board to vote on athletic policy revisions Monday
Coaches defend lowering standard



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File Art - Education - SBCSC Building
The South Bend Community School Corporation building in downtown South Bend. SBT File Photo/GREG SWIERCZ


What grades does it take to play?
Indiana High School Athletic Association requirement:
Students must pass (with at least a D-) 70 percent of their classes.
South Bend schools’ current requirement:
All student athletes must maintain at least a 2.0 GPA to be eligible to participate.
South Bend schools’ proposed new requirement:
Freshmen would be allowed to participate with a 1.5 grade point average, sophomores with a 1.67 GPA, juniors with a 1.85 GPA and seniors would still be required to have a 2.0 GPA.

Furthermore, students who don’t meet those GPA guidelines (but still qualify via IHSAA guidelines), would be able to participate in sports if they take part in tutoring opportunities provided by the district and show improvement in their grades.
Posted: Sunday, August 2, 2015 5:00 am | Updated: 5:08 am, Sun Aug 2, 2015.
By Kim Kilbride South Bend Tribune

SOUTH BEND — A proposed policy change by the South Bend Community School Corp. to relax eligibility requirements for student athletes has drawn a firestorm of criticism since it was introduced two weeks ago.


In short, the board is proposing to relax grade point guidelines for student-athletes while at the same time allowing those who struggle to continue playing if they take part in study tables and show improving grades.
The South Bend Common Council unanimously passed a resolution asking the district to put the brakes on the proposal. Former University of Notre Dame basketball coach Digger Phelps has publicly decried the plan, saying when kids aren’t challenged, they’ll be satisfied earning Ds. And a member of the school board who strongly opposes it, says he’s gotten dozens of emails and phone calls from community members who support him.

But, South Bend coaches The Tribune interviewed last week say the change is needed because students who don’t meet the current 2.0 grade point average requirement — which is more stringent than the Indiana High School Athletic Association’s eligibility requirement — are falling through the cracks when they’re forbidden to participate.
Milt Lee, an intermediate center baseball and football coach in South Bend, who also has two kids of his own in the district, supports the proposed changes to the athletic eligibility policy.
Every season, he said, he has to inform at least one student that because of his grades, he can’t play.
As a coach, Lee, who also is executive director of the Food Bank of Northern Indiana, said, “You get tired of seeing the same type of kid losing out on opportunities. He’s at a stage in his life when maybe he hasn’t quite figured things out. Maybe he’s moved three times. … It’s just discouraging to see that happen when you know if that kid had an opportunity to be around a team, that type of family, things could change for him.”
The proposed policy for middle school athletics follows IHSAA standards, which require student athletes to pass 70 percent of their classes.
The policy for high school athletes would be more stringent than IHSAA’s, but less restrictive than South Bend’s current policy, which requires a 2.0 GPA.
And students who don’t meet the district’s requirements (but still qualify via IHSAA guidelines) would be able to participate in sports if they take part in tutoring opportunities provided by the district and show improvement in their grades.
Both Penn and Mishawaka high schools follow the IHSAA academic eligibility guidelines. If the policy changes are implemented when the board votes on the matter on Monday evening, South Bend’s standards would still be higher.
“I know there’s a perception out there that we’re lowering the standards,” board Secretary Stan Wruble said last week, “but we’re absolutely requiring two things” of students, he said, that they “attend study tables and improve their grades.”
The policy change, said Wruble, who is also on a new athletic committee that recommended the changes, is needed not to make South Bend athletic teams more competitive, but to save kids.
“It’s for those borderline athletes we might otherwise lose to the streets,” he said.
Joe Szajko, a math teacher and head football coach at Clay High School, said more than 80 students signed up for football last spring. But when grades came out, he learned that 31 were academically ineligible. Statistically, he said, those students will not come back and try out again.
“We lose them,” Szajko said. And once we lose them, it’s hard to pull them back because they get involved with other things.”
The current 2.0 policy, he said, is a great concept in theory. But, year after year, it excludes kids who he believes could have benefited from being on the team.
“It’s not like we’re advocating this because we think we’ve got a bunch of kids that just can’t make it” academically, he said of the policy revisions. “No, we’re advocating it because we’ve got a lot of kids who are searching to be part of something. I just think every kid needs to have a chance to be part of the team.

The history
South Bend’s current policy, which was phased in between 2009 and 2012, mandates a 2.0 GPA for student-athletes in grades six through 12.
That initiative was spearheaded by former board member Roger Parent, along with a committee of coaches and administrators.
Parent has spoken out against the proposed changes, which, he says, dilute the intention of the current policy that is to create higher expectations for all students.
The policy in place now was also supported by former Superintendent James Kapsa after many modifications to phase it in slowly and amid a commitment on Kapsa’s part to establish study tables. The district got a huge boost in 2010 when it received a four-year federal grant worth $205,000 each year to run after-school study tables for all students at Riley and Washington high schools. Clay and Adams also had after-school tutoring programs.
And though the federal grant ran out after the 2013-14 school year, study tables for athletes have continued at each of the district’s four high schools, a spokeswoman said.
Opposing voices
Chris Matthys, a former South Bend teacher and athletic director who was involved in crafting the current 2.0 policy said he has a lot of questions about the proposed policy.
“What GPA are you talking about? Current? Cumulative? Previous grading period? … And all that grade standard does is trigger (participation in) study tables. What if they (athletes) don’t go to study tables for one week? Can they go the next week and (be eligible to) play?”
Matthys, who teaches in Michigan now, said he agrees with Parent that kids will generally live up to adult expectations for their academic performance. But, he said, it takes a lot of work, commitment and resources to make that happen.
“The (proposed) policy has no teeth to it from a practical standpoint,” he said. “There’s little data out there saying kids are dropping out of school because they can’t play in sports.”

Jennifer Chokey, a 2014 Riley High School graduate and two-sport athlete, said she’d like to see the athletic eligibility policy remain as is.
Though she said her GPA never dropped below a 2.0 in high school, the current policy was never stressed by her coaches. So, she fears that if the standards are lowered, there likely will be even less emphasis on athletes’ academic achievement.

Chokey is now a college student and tutor at the Kroc Center. “I want my students to want to learn and want to crave knowledge,” she said. “I want every one of those kids to want the most in life because I can already see their potential.”
One school board member, Bill Sniadecki, has vocalized his opposition to the policy change since it was first introduced two weeks ago.
After he wrote a Viewpoint that was published in The Tribune on July 24, Sniadecki said he received dozens of emails and phone calls from community members saying they agree with him, that it’s a disservice to students to lower GPA standards for athletes.
But since then, he’s come up with a compromise, which he says he’ll present at Monday’s board meeting.
He’d like the 2.0 GPA requirement to be maintained for all student-athletes, but he likes the idea of allowing those whose grades slip below that — but who still meet the IHSAA guidelines — to attend study tables, show improvement in their grades and still be able to participate in sports.
Szajko, the Clay High School coach, said of the current policy, “Standards are good. But there’s also got to be that level of forgiveness built in where we’re going to give you a chance and provide the support needed.”
There are also an indeterminate number of students who don’t even bother trying out for sports in South Bend, Szajko said, because they know they don’t meet the 2.0 GPA requirement.
“But if you tell a kid, ‘(if) you can pass by IHSAA standards, you can play, but you have to go to study table,’’ he said, “ it creates a culture where a kid says, ‘you know what? I might be able to make it.’”

http://www.southbendtribune.com/news/ed ... ge&photo=0
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Re: SBCSC - Dumbing Down

Postby raycyrx » Mon Aug 03, 2015 1:32 pm

http://www.southbendtribune.com/sports/ ... mode=print

For starters, understand that a student needs to pass just 70 percent of his or her classes to be eligible in the eyes of the IHSAA – four Ds and an F would suffice. That ludicrous basement is a whole ‘nuther column waiting to happen.

While a majority of schools around the state take that as a token line in the sand, South Bend — with front page headlines blaring — wouldn't settle for that six years ago.

Under the current format, five Cs and a C-minus? See ya, try again next season. Is that right?

I think Al has a good point.
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Re: SBCSC - Dumbing Down

Postby Happy Mom » Mon Aug 03, 2015 8:37 pm

WSBT-TV added 3 new photos.
1 min ·
‪#‎BREAKING‬: A controversial proposal that would lower the academic requirements for athletes has passed in South Bend.
The proposal will relax the minimum 2.0 requirement by grade level with freshmen starting at 1.5. The plan sparked a lot of debate on both sides since its introduction two weeks ago.
We had a crew at tonight’s meeting and will have more details tonight on WSBT 22 News at 11.
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Re: SBCSC - Dumbing Down

Postby Happy Mom » Tue Aug 04, 2015 6:43 am

South Bend school board votes to lower GPA requirements for student athletes

Posted: Aug 03, 2015 10:55 PM EDT
By Alexis Gray, Multimedia JournalistCONNECT


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SOUTH BEND -
South Bend student athletes will now be able to walk on the playing field, even if they're only managing a D average in class. The school board voted Monday in favor of lowering that GPA requirement from a 2.0 down to a 1.5.

The line to speak at Monday's school board meeting stretched across the entire 3rd floor. Legendary former Notre Dame basketball coach Digger Phelps sat front and center.

While there were definitely several supporters of the new plan, there's no doubt most folks who showed up to speak tonight left this building very disappointed.

"There's a fallacy out there that all of our student athletes are D and F students," said former Clay High School Athletic Director Greg Humnicky.

Humnicky says 80-90 percent of their student athletes have a higher GPA than the grade average of the entire study body.

But some kids are falling through the cracks.
"The idea that a student with five Cs and a C- makes him ineligible under that 2.0 standard," said Humnicky. "You know for some student athletes, for some students, that's the best they can do!"

Other supporters mentioned special needs students, saying the GPA limits unfairly exclude students with learning disabilities.

"Thank you for finally looking at the policy and realizing that all kids don't fit the box," said after school and summer educator Lesley Wesley.

But most speakers said expanding that box to let athletes play with a D is simply unacceptable.
"We raised the bar at our house!" said parent Samuel Brown. "Because you are lowering the bar!"
"Out of every person that I've spoken to," said parent Jesse Davis. "Not one person has been in favor of this."

In favor or not, the school board voted 5 to 2 to allow Freshman athletes to meet just a 1.5 in order to play. Now only seniors must maintain a 2.0 to throw on a jersey.

"I don't care if you want to be an electrician or an electric engineer," said Digger Phelps. "This does not count!"
Several councilmembers were also in attendance, including Dr. Fred Ferlic and Henry Davis Jr.. And Derek Dieter submitted a written statement - all three speaking against lowering the grade average,

If students a willingness to improve and attend study sessions, they can still play, even if they can't meet that 1.5 minimum. But Both Councilmen Dr. Fred Ferlic and Derek Dieter say there are no study tables, due to a lack of funding and other issues.


http://www.fox28.com/story/29700777/201 ... t-athletes
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Re: SBCSC - Dumbing Down

Postby Happy Mom » Tue Aug 04, 2015 6:58 am

SB school board relaxes GPA requirements for student athletes

Updated: Mon 11:53 PM, Aug 03, 2015
By: Megan Hickey - Email

Image

The current 2.0 GPA requirement was lowered to 1.5 for freshman, 1.67 for sophomores and 1.85 for juniors. The requirement remains at 2.0 for seniors.
South Bend, Ind. The South Bend Community School Corp. Board of Trustees voted Monday night to relax the academic standards for students to be eligible to participate in school sports.


The current 2.0 GPA requirement was lowered to 1.5 for freshman, 1.67 for sophomores and 1.85 for juniors. The requirement remains at 2.0 for seniors.

Students are also required to pass 70 percent of their classes.

The change comes 6 years after the 2.0 benchmark was originally set.

Member of the Superintendent's Athletic Committee that drafted the proposal argued that the standards resulted in fewer students participating in South Bend school sports over the last five years and that few returned to the teams once removed.

"While the initial policy is extremely well-intentioned, it ended up being a symbolic gesture who no impact on our academic or our athletics," said SBCSC board member Stan Wruble, District 2.

At-Large board members Bill Sniadecki and Maritza Robles voted against the new standards, arguing that it sends the wrong message to students about goals and achievement. The remaining 6 board members voted in favor.

Study tables were mentioned several times in Monday night's debate. In 2010, the school corporation received a four-year federal grant to run after-school study tables at several schools. Many people criticized the study table system for being short-lived or insufficient.

This time around, Superintendent Carole Schmidt said the SBCSC will make a financial commitment to support the study tables and the stipend for teachers to go with it.

Even with the new policy in place, South Bend's eligibility requirements are still higher than neighboring Penn and Mishawaka high schools. Those districts follow the Indiana High School Athletic Association standards, which require students to pass at least 70 percent of their classes with at least a D- grade.

Coaches and athletic directors came out on both sides of the issue Monday night.

"We're not requiring A's to play. We're saying a C average," said former Notre Dame Coach Digger Phelps, who's been a long-time supporter of maintaining academic standards for student athletes. "Where's the tutoring, where the mentoring?"


But Milt Lee, an intermediate center baseball and football coach, said the previous 2.0 requirement led to many kids falling through the cracks.

"We are not helping kids learn how to be great adults and be great at anything if we don't allow them eligibility," Lee said at the podium.

Current South Bend School Corp. Teacher Drew Danik, who sat on the Superintendent's Athletic Committee, said critics of the proposal shouldn't fixate on the numbers.

"We have worked hard to try to come up with something that will help out kids," Danik said. "We want more kids to participate. We want more kids to be successful."

http://www.wndu.com/home/headlines/SB-s ... 54312.html
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Re: SBCSC - Dumbing Down

Postby Happy Mom » Tue Aug 04, 2015 7:45 am

South Bend school board votes to relax 2.0 policy for athletes
Board president commits to funding for better study tables :liar:


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South Bend school board votes to relax 2.0 policy for athletes
Greg Swiercz
Members of the John Adams High School freshmen football team go through drills Monday afternoon. Later on Monday, South Bend's school board voted to relax academic eligibility guidelines for student athletes, while at the same time, requiring those who fall short to participate in study tables and show improvement in their grades. SBT Photo/GREG SWIERCZ
Posted: Tuesday, August 4, 2015 6:00 am | Updated: 7:21 am, Tue Aug 4, 2015.
By Kim Kilbride South Bend Tribune

SOUTH BEND — After an hour of testimony, during which impassioned pleas from people on both sides of the issue were heard, South Bend Community School Corp.’s board voted 5-2 Monday evening to relax academic eligibility requirements for student athletes.


Board member Bill Sniadecki and Vice President Maritza Robles voted against the measure.
The old policy required a 2.0 grade-point average for students in intermediate centers and high schools. Now, freshmen will be allowed to participate in sports with a 1.5 GPA, sophomores with a 1.67 GPA and juniors with a 1.85 GPA. Seniors will still be required to have a 2.0 GPA.
However, the policy revision approved by the board Monday also calls for allowing students who struggle to continue playing if they meet Indiana High School Athletic Association guidelines for eligibility and take part in study tables and show improving grades.
Intermediate center students only have to meet IHSAA requirements, which call for student athletes to pass 70 percent of classes with a D-minus or better.
School board President Jay Caponigro said the board will carve out the funding for and hold the administration responsible for implementing high-quality study tables at all four high schools. The district athletic director also will be responsible for collecting data on the impact of the new policy, Caponigro said, and reporting it to the board and the public at least annually.
The policy revision came out of a superintendent’s athletic committee that has been meeting for months.
That committee, board Secretary Stan Wruble said, focused on what could be done to better engage students, teach them life skills and study skills and keep them in school.

“Never once did success on the field come into play,” Wruble said.
The former 2.0 policy was phased in between 2009 and 2012 and was spearheaded by former board member Roger Parent, along with a committee of coaches and administrators.
At the time, former University of Notre Dame basketball coach Digger Phelps publicly supported the 2.0 policy.
Phelps was among the dozen community members who spoke in opposition to the new policy on Monday.
Former South Bend Superintendent Jim Kapsa also came out to speak in favor of the 2.0 policy and to volunteer his support to enhance after-school tutoring opportunities for athletes.
Community member David Frank said there should be more public input before a decision is made.
And Debra Turner asked, “What happens to these students when the game is over?”

Some members of the South Bend Common Council attended and spoke against the policy change. Last week, the council passed a resolution asking the school district to put the brakes on the initiative.
A little more than half as many people spoke in favor of the policy change.
Milt Lee, a South Bend coach and member of the district’s athletic committee, said students are falling through the cracks. And, participation in athletics is a way to potentially save them, he said.
“What I like about this proposal,” Lee said, “is it welcomes” students “to the family,” gives them an opportunity to be part of a team.
Before the board voted on the new policy, Sniadecki attempted to table it until the next meeting. After that motion failed, he attempted to amend the new policy proposal with one of his own. He favored keeping the 2.0 GPA requirement for intermediate center and high school athletes, but allowing those who fall short to still participate in sports if they attend study tables and show improvement in their grades. That motion failed, as well.
Sniadecki said he was only trying to do what’s right for students. And Robles agreed with him saying despite all that she’d heard, she still supported the 2.0 policy.
After having it pointed out by Sniadecki that her school board platform was high standards for all, board member Michelle Engel said there’s no evidence the 2.0 policy has worked.

But, she said, “nothing is forever and written in blood … This is what we do … This is a living policy.”
The new policy
• Freshmen can participate in sports with a 1.5 grade-point average, sophomores with 1.67 GPA, juniors with 1.85 GPA. Seniors must still have a 2.0 GPA.
• Students who don’t meet GPA guidelines (but still qualify via IHSAA guidelines) can participate if they take part in tutoring and show improvement in their grades.
How'd they vote?
Board member Bill Sniadecki and Vice President Maritza Robles voted against the policy revision that relaxed the GPA requirements for student athletes. President Jay Caponigro, Secretary Stan Wruble, John Anella and Michelle Engel voted in favor of the change.

http://www.southbendtribune.com/news/ed ... 22149.html
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Re: SBCSC - Dumbing Down

Postby bdcbbq » Tue Aug 04, 2015 8:23 am

While I hate the idea of dumbing down the standards. The rationale does have some merit. It might have been an easier sell if you had to have a 2.0 average to play in games, but 1.5 to be on the team. That would seem to be more of an incentive.
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Re: SBCSC - Dumbing Down

Postby bob_rx2000 » Tue Aug 04, 2015 11:27 am

In the race to the bottom of educational standards it seems the SBCSC has taken a giant step towards the lead.
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Re: SBCSC - Dumbing Down

Postby Happy Mom » Wed Aug 05, 2015 7:08 am

MORE reaction: SB School Board relaxes GPA standards

Updated: Tue 7:16 PM, Aug 04, 2015
By: Megan Hickey, Maria Catanzarite


More Video...

Lowering GPA requirements

SBCSC votes to relax GPA standards for student athletes
The current 2.0 GPA requirement has been lowered to 1.5 for freshman, 1.67 for sophomores and 1.85 for juniors. The requirement remains at 2.0 for seniors.
SOUTH BEND, Ind.--- The community continues to weigh in on a controversial policy to lower GPA standards for high school student-athletes.

"Really, I think it should be a non-issue," said Cindy Misener, a retired teacher from Riley High School.

The South Bend Community School Corp. Board of Trustees voted Monday night to relax the academic standards for students to be eligible to participate in school sports.

The current 2.0 GPA requirement was lowered to 1.5 for freshman, 1.67 for sophomores and 1.85 for juniors. The requirement remains at 2.0 for seniors.

Students are also required to pass 70 percent of their classes.

The change comes 6 years after the 2.0 benchmark was originally set.

"If we can keep another student from dropping out because of sports and academics, then that's helpful for South Bend Schools," Misener said on Tuesday.

Member of the Superintendent's Athletic Committee that drafted the proposal argued that the standards resulted in fewer students participating in South Bend school sports over the last five years and that few returned to the teams once removed.

"While the initial policy is extremely well-intentioned, it ended up being a symbolic gesture with no impact on our academic or our athletics," said SBCSC board member Stan Wruble, District 2.

Marie Doan, the athletic director at Riley High School, sits on the Superintendent's Athletic Committee. On Tuesday, she said the policy is geared toward the students who struggle in school. The ultimate goal? Help the students surpass the minimum GPA requirements.

"[Those students] don't want to be the person who brings the team down -- not only on the court but also in the classroom," she said. "I think it pushes them to be a part of the team, part of that group," said Doan.

At-Large board members Bill Sniadecki and Maritza Robles voted against the new standards, arguing that it sends the wrong message to students about goals and achievement. The remaining 6 board members voted in favor.

Study tables were mentioned several times in Monday night's debate. In 2010, the school corporation received a four-year federal grant to run after-school study tables at several schools. Many people criticized the study table system for being short-lived or insufficient.

This time around, Superintendent Carole Schmidt said the SBCSC will make a financial commitment to support the study tables and the stipend for teachers to go with it.

Even with the new policy in place, South Bend's eligibility requirements are still higher than neighboring Penn and Mishawaka high schools. Those districts follow the Indiana High School Athletic Association standards, which require students to pass at least 70 percent of their classes with at least a D- grade.

Coaches and athletic directors came out on both sides of the issue Monday night.

"We're not requiring A's to play. We're saying a C average," said former Notre Dame Coach Digger Phelps, who's been a long-time supporter of maintaining academic standards for student athletes. "Where's the tutoring, where the mentoring?"

But Milt Lee, an intermediate center baseball and football coach, said the previous 2.0 requirement led to many kids falling through the cracks.

"We are not helping kids learn how to be great adults and be great at anything if we don't allow them eligibility," Lee said at the podium.

Current South Bend School Corp. Teacher Drew Danik, who sat on the Superintendent's Athletic Committee, said critics of the proposal shouldn't fixate on the numbers.

"We have worked hard to try to come up with something that will help out kids," Danik said. "We want more kids to participate. We want more kids to be successful."



Comments....


Ever heard the term "dumb jock"? We need more kids that think sports are more important than a good education!! We see it every time we drive by their multi million sports fields. All while we are cutting programs and laying off teachers!! Way to go South Bend.
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Sean M Larry • 21 hours ago
South Bend needs to remember this for Nov. 2016. Save Sniadecki and Robles, at least they have a backbone, vote the rest out who can be.
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Joe Walsh Larry • 14 hours ago
While I disagree with the change, I'm trying to remember where South Bend has multi million dollar sports fields. St Joe maybe, but that was privately funded. What fields are you talking about?
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Just_A_Thought_79 • a day ago
LOL, congratulations SBCSC you are nothing more than an official joke now. Really, a 1.5 GPA???? You earn that just for showing up, any idiot, and I mean any idiot, could get that GPA. Basically you just removed the GPA requirement. A 2.0 is not difficult to maintain either, you just have to simply do your work and have a modicum of discipline. Too bad you would rather see kids play a sport instead of being responsible.
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beegoreilly • 21 hours ago
South Bend schools just keeps getting dumber and dumber. You are supposed to be helping kids succeed in the classroom, not getting them into a sport. The idiocy of this school corporation, and by in large the city of South Bend, knows no bounds!
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Johnny99 beegoreilly • 10 hours ago
Thank Derek Deiter for making the happen for you!
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zDaen • a day ago
They must have some real dumb ones coming through who's only hope is basset ball.
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Katie Ridenour • a day ago
You want more kids to be successful. You want more kids to participate in sports (because, you know, sports are more important than that book-learning). So you lower the standards. Right. Got it.

How was this drafted by a bunch of adults? Nice to see our tax dollars going to waste so that public schools can attempt to make a little extra money off of student sports programs.

Low grades are a SYMPTOM of a larger problem. Maybe if teachers were given back authority in their classrooms, paid a decent salary and treated with respect by their school systems--they would be able to help these students better. Telling problem students, "Oh, you can still be in sports!" solves nothing. You've just, once again, given athletes a freebie.
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albaby2 Katie Ridenour • 9 hours ago
Playing sports will help get them jobs as air traffic controllers.
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Mike h • 20 hours ago
Vote these people out of office next year. Ask. Yourself this question: as an employer would you hire a person with a 70% average grade who can playa sport or hire a person with a C/B grade? SB will have a system of "dumb jocks. And you wonder why so many choose to get vouchers for other schools. Wake up people.
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Lorina • a day ago
Basically you're sending the message that education doesn't matter as much as sports. Kids NEED to know math and English well so that when they get in the working world they can find a job to support themselves and or a family. Not everyone can find a job for themselves in sports. If they blow out a knee or hurt themselves where they can never play again then what do they have..NOTHING because getting a good education wasn't made a priority in school. I guess what im trying to say is that education is important when you lower the standard you're putting education second to a sport.
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albaby2 Lorina • 9 hours ago
Not really. Having played sports will help you get a job as an air traffic controller. Just remember next time you fly that your ATC got there on a sports scholarship.
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Sean M • a day ago
Mayor Pete, where you at? What's your opinion on the dumbing down of your constituency? Or is this just the type of measure you silently suuport to ensure your re-election year after year? This is more dangerous than not being served pizza.
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Jonny Smith Sean M • a day ago
Mayor Pete?? He will not say anything, he's a dumbocrat - dumbing down is the dumbocratic approach to everything
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Atrejo Sean M • a day ago
Trying on another dress for his second Coming Out party
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Common Sense • 19 hours ago
Keep lowering those standards and they'll end up just like the star athletes on notre dump's team.
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Go_Irish_Go Common Sense • 18 hours ago
Obsessed w/ ND you are. Can always count on you, chum!
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Common Sense Go_Irish_Go • 13 hours ago
Just pointing out a simple fact bestie. I notice you're copying the lingo, I can always count on a fan to copy me. Thanks!
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Go_Irish_Go Common Sense • 10 hours ago
Yeah, a simple fact LOL. Here's breaking news for ya: A fact is something that's true. You're very unfamiliar with both.
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King caca of @#$% Mountain • 20 hours ago
Hahaha. And people say South Bend isn't dying. Enjoy your coffin.
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Deviant • a day ago
I weep for the future.
You all notice this is insinuating athletes are, shall we say, special needs? Education comes first. Read up, do the assignment, then get some sports practice in. They don't deserve this treatment. Can you imagine the psychological impact on the rest of students? "Heh, join the team and I won't have to work so hard." or "My bud gets a break so why should I have to make good grades, too?".

Hard to believe this was even an idea and worse of all people actually approved of it. At this rate, in 10 years, all you'll need to get into college is a pencil. "Grades won't matter. Got a pencil? Get in there, it's physics!"
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Tammy smith • a day ago
What do you expect from a fired Benton Harbor superintendent ? I can't believe this even passed .
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bubba507 Tammy smith • 11 hours ago
That's right - wasn't even fit to handle B.H.
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albaby2 bubba507 • 9 hours ago
Trying to do anything in BH is as futile as trying to herd cats.
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Sean M • a day ago
I cannot believe board members supported this measure. So a student may carry a D- average and fail 2 of their classes and still remain eligible? What low expectations we have for this generation; one can only wonder how low their own expectations will be when they finally raise their own children. Shame on you SBCSC for contributing to the destruction of the United States.
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Beckie Sean M • 21 hours ago
How about shaming Penn for having lower standards than SB?
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mama sea Beckie • 20 hours ago
That doesn't help anyone. How about fix the problem at hand. Worry less about comparisons.
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Paula • 18 hours ago
Actually to play sports, it should be a 3.0. It's a privilege to be on a sports team and represent your school.
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Margmary • 20 hours ago
The voucher program exists for a reason. So glad my kids are not part of the SBCSC. Just keep lowering those standards...
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Geo Graphy • a day ago
"We want more kids to be successful." At what? Why not just let them hang some place and play video games until practice ot game time? Why even bother to keep them in a class room? How many football players will be successful when they go to college on a scholarship but cannot read the play book?

'"We are not helping kids learn how to be great adults and be great at
anything if we don't allow them eligibility," Lee said at the podium.' Really? If they cannot make it in life, just lower the standards. After all, it is not the "kid's" fault they cannot read or write.
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Atrejo • a day ago
In the end all SBCSC wants is for the schools to do better in sports. School sports is the biggest money maker around, and if a local team goes state that also even bigger revenue for the district. All about the Benjamins! Who cares about teaching wages or passing grades, when you can have a Winning team.
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WHATS_THE_GOOD_NEWS • a day ago
SBCSC, I'm so dissapointed.
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Brandi David • 9 hours ago
The biggest shame is that this prioritizes sports as an extracurricular activity, and does nothing for students involved in other, non-sports oriented, extracurriculars that take up a substantial amount of time. I'm thinking band (which often includes marching band and involves hours of practice outside of the school year), drama club(s), poms, cheerleading, etc.
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Geo Graphy • 10 hours ago
Yep, WNDU is censoring comments made here.
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Ruspert • 20 hours ago
Sports should not be allowed in schools.
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bubba507 Ruspert • 11 hours ago
ya? Why not?
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Toby • a day ago
Digger wants to know where the mentoring is? Ask Dr. M Wilson- didn't she squander over +$1M doing that already? BTW, there are currently "study tables " before practice where students just mess around and not study.
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RealityCheck • a day ago
Lower your standards and then complain about low istep scores.
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Beckie • a day ago
While I don't like lowering standards ever, I also read that their guidelines are still stricter than Mishawaka and Penn. Why isn't anyone on Penn to raise their standards?
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JJ Beckie • 14 hours ago
Since you keep posting the same comment, I will repost beegoreilly's comment: Beckie the article is not about Penn or Mishawaka schools. Look at their test scores as a whole. Penn and Mishawaka blow the doors off South Bends test scores and graduation rate. I'm not worried about Penn or Mishawaka.
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Sean M Beckie • 17 hours ago
So you're basically saying our dog sh*t smells better than theirs? Newsflash: It's still sh*t!
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kathy fodge • a day ago
So apparently WNDU is just screening the comments to this article, because I commented negatively commented to this story and my response just "disappeared".
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albaby2 kathy fodge • 9 hours ago
Me too.
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Joanie Makielski • a day ago
What has happened to SBSC!!! Oh my, are they being bullied by their Sports or Athletic Directors
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albaby2 • 9 hours ago
What is meant by "helps SB schools" is it helps the head count and funding if they are kept in school. SB schools feels that if they can't meet standards, lower the standards. Probably grade the same way to make sure they even meet the new lower standards. Nowbthey can plat hoops or roam the streets all night and still be eligible. Are the same considerations given to non-athletes?
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kathy fodge • 10 hours ago
What the heck! This is bologna! Yeah, lower you standards, that'll get you a better quality of student, (as if). Just like Digger said, "tutor them, mentor them", don't just say that stupid is good enough. I could not believe that when I originally posted this that nobody else had commented on this story. Now I believe that they did comment and like me, were so outraged by the ignorance of this decision that they were not able to "watch their mouth" and got deleted.

WOW! I wonder why we're falling behind other countries in jobs, inventions, medical advances, getting rid of fossil fuels etc... This is crazy, first they can't even sign their own names on their paychecks, now this! What next? I'm at a loss, it is sad, so sad.
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housekeeping • 10 hours ago
A 2.0 average is not that hard to achieve. Basically, show up and turn in your homework. If that is too tough the child should've been aborted.
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roxoxo • 11 hours ago
talk about dumbing down America
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bubba507 • 11 hours ago
Yep - Indiana just gets dumber and dumber.
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Danny • 16 hours ago
People, start being open minded a little more. Maybe, just maybe this is a good thing. Before you bash me and say I'm a democrat, that would be far from the truth... In the very beginning when this hit the news I thought like most did. Then I pondered on it. Most kids with low grades do not have positive role models in their lives. I think we can all say that is a fair assessment for the most part. Let's have a middle ground here, maybe allow one on the team for low grades, but do not allow them to play until their grades come up. How is this beneficial? You are now putting a coach in a kids life whom might just need that positive role model. Someone who will be influential on them. Someone who will give them the discipline they need. Not everyone is lucky to have a great parent in their life. Or a great role model. Because of that, ones mind has different views. Maybe a coach can help change that mindset and show them that they are worth something and should strive for something in life. We need to be creative in ways how we can put positive role models in ones life rather than take them out of ones life. A coach can be that person that makes a positive impact on ones life. That's what we need for these kids.
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http://www.wndu.com/home/headlines/SB-s ... 54312.html
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Re: SBCSC - Dumbing Down

Postby Happy Mom » Tue Dec 01, 2015 10:19 pm

South Bend school board hears about impact of new athletic eligibility policy
Relaxed standards result in mandatory tutoring for 15 athletes


South Bend school board hears about impact of new athletic eligibility policy
Under South Bend Community School Corp.'s new relaxed academic standards for athletes, just 15 students were required to attend school-sponsored tutoring to maintain eligibility after the first grading period. SBT File Photo
Posted: Tuesday, December 1, 2015 7:00 am
By Kim Kilbride South Bend Tribune

SOUTH BEND — Operating with newly relaxed academic eligibility requirements for student athletes, South Bend Community School Corp. required just 15 high school students to take part in school-sponsored tutoring to remain eligible for their respective sports after the first grading period this school year.
Kirby Whitacre, the district’s athletic director, updated the school board at its Monday night meeting on the impact of the new policy, which has been controversial but which supporters say creates opportunities and equity for all student athletes.
Three of the 15 students impacted after the first grading period decided to quit their teams and did not use the study tables, Whitacre said. While seven of the remaining students showed academic improvement after the tutoring, five did not and ultimately lost eligibility.
By a 5-2 vote in August, the board changed the district’s policy for student athletes to allow freshmen, sophomores and juniors to participate with grade-point averages of 1.5, 1.67 and 1.85 respectively. Seniors are required to have a 2.0, mirroring the old policy for all athletes.
However, the new policy, which was studied and recommended by the superintendent’s athletic committee, allows students who don’t meet those academic guidelines to continue playing if they meet Indiana High School Athletic Association guidelines for eligibility and take part in study tables and show improving grades.
Intermediate center students only have to meet IHSAA requirements, which call for student athletes to pass 70 percent of classes with a D-minus or better.
School board President Jay Caponigro said in August that the board would carve out the funding for and hold the administration responsible for implementing high-quality study tables at all four high schools.
Whitacre said Monday the study tables are used by athletes and other students who need extra academic help.
The GPA policy revision came out of the superintendent’s athletic committee,which has been meeting for months.
In other athletic policy-related news, the committee, which is chaired by board secretary Stan Wruble, told the administration and school board Monday it has four additional recommendations:
• The district athletic director should sit on the committee to hire high school athletic directors and coaches for football and basketball, and should report directly to the superintendent. The current structure reduces the authority of the position.
• The district should “promote a sense of pride and a culture of success” in athletics by doing things such as developing a South Bend logo for all team uniforms and finding ways to increase ticket sales to students. Schools have been operating with too much autonomy and insufficient connection with the district as a whole, the committee believes.
• Public and private fundraising options should be explored to pay for improvements to athletic facilities in disrepair. Circuit Breaker tax caps have left the district with less money in capital projects fund to make such improvements.
• An advisory council for the district athletic director should be created to obtain “multiple inputs” from across the school corporation.
Whitacre said the committee set out to rectify problems that have existed for some time that have put the district at a competitive disadvantage when it comes to athletics.
http://www.southbendtribune.com/news/ed ... dc837.html
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