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The War Against Law Enforcement and Authority

The truth you won't hear from the media

Re: The War Against Law Enforcement and Authority

Postby Happy Mom » Fri Jun 12, 2015 7:41 pm

COMMENTS IN THE SBTRIBUNE;


Tommy Leszcz · Follow · IUSB
Why is it no one from the press or news media is mentioning the real reason the SBPD officers won't work the Bike the Bend is because the person in charge of the event wrote a scathing letter criticizing the officers standing around the intersections doing nothing. A sincere apology from the person in charge might help alleviate the situation. The Chief along with the FOP #36, can spin this anyway they want, but officers are not tired of working, they are tired of being criticized!

Reply · Unlike · 2 · Follow Post · 8 hours ago

Michael Carman · Top Commenter · Mishawaka, Indiana
Congratulations to the police. The taxpayers are spending way too much money on "bikers" which do nothing for the economy other than create problems for real taxpayers and spenders.
This "Ride The Bend" event does absolutely nothing for the cities involved. Many are out-of-towners who don't spend a single dollar.
Look at all the money spent on bike trails especially over by the bridge on Logan and Lincolnway. They closed the street, put up lights, and created problems for drivers and those who live there. All this time and money and on the average, you will see maybe one or two "bikers" using it.
The River-Walk is not called the "River-Biking" and because of the "few" bikers who use it, those who walk are placed in danger. The non-spending bikers travel through there at high rates of speed and if they do hit
someone, there could be serious damage if not a loss
of life. The vast majority of "bikers" are "out-of-towners" who come here because there own cities are smart enough not to cater to them.


http://www.southbendtribune.com/news/lo ... 99f03.html


Saw this on Facebook and it cracked me up!


I'm not trying to be an icicle BUT does anybody else think it's weird that they tore up Lincolnway and put in a bike path?? I guess South Bend is wanting to get drug dealers and hookers on a path to a healthy living style
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Re: The War Against Law Enforcement and Authority

Postby Happy Mom » Sat Jun 13, 2015 9:30 am

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Re: The War Against Law Enforcement and Authority

Postby Happy Mom » Thu Jun 18, 2015 7:00 am

New Pool Fight Video Attempts to Make Cops Look Racist, But There’s a HUGE Problem…

Michael Cantrell
June 17, 2015 12:13 pm

Well, liberals will be thrilled to hear their disgusting racially divisive, anti-police narrative is indeed having it’s desired effect on the youth of America.

With the hype surrounding the McKinney pool party still going somewhat strong, young hooligans across the country are using video recorded encounters with police to try justifying their obnoxious — and often illegal — behavior.


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Here’s a perfect example of what I mean.

From BizPacReview:

An argument at a public pool in Fairfield, Ohio, escalated into a brawl and four arrests last week – then turned racial on Tuesday when a prominent local black clergyman held a news conference to denounce what he called police brutality, complete with a broken jaw and broken ribs.

The mother of a 12-year-old girl involved in the fight claimed the girl suffered a broken jaw and three broken ribs while being arrested, but EMTs on the scene recorded no injuries other than “the side effects of pepper spray,” the Hamilton Journal-News reported.

The mother refused to discuss her daughter’s alleged injury at a news conference about the incident Tuesday, but the Rev. Bobby Hilton of Word Deliverance Ministries in Forest Park, Ohio, told reporters he is angry the public has sided with the police in the incident.

But police brutality isn’t the impression the video gives. As the Journal-News puts it:

In the footage, where loud screams are heard throughout, an officer is seen pulling a young girl away from the crowd with his arm around her neck and arm as he puts her against a vehicle and pulls her arms behind her back. The girl screams throughout before finally saying, “Ok, Ok.” Another male officer is seen using pepper spray on a young girl who is clinging desperately to an iron gate as a female officer grabs her around the neck in an attempt to dislodge her. The officer can be heard shouting, “Just let go of the gate…Get off the gate.”

As a caller to 911 put it, according to the Journal-News:

“They’re videotaping, trying to make it look like a racist thing, and it’s not at all. They were breaking our policies. We told them they couldn’t be here anymore, and it’s really scary and I don’t feel safe.”


Apparently no EMTs reported anyone complaining about a jaw injury, and the teens who were treated at local hospitals didn’t have any broken ribs either.

I’m not a genius, but I’m almost certain someone here is being a little less than honest.

It seems from the 911 call that these kids were violating pool policy and were refusing to leave, therefore they were there illegally.

Kids these days don’t seem to understand that breaking the law comes with consequences, and not listening to police typically doesn’t end well either. Perhaps if they would’ve done what they were told, the situation could’ve been avoided.

Then again, young people today aren’t afraid of the law because they can take short little videos like this and conveniently twist what’s happening in the footage to create a narrative that makes cops look like the bad guys, giving them a free pass for acting like a bunch of jerks.

The only reason this type of thing works is because liberal media will automatically side with the kids because of their skin color, as that helps push their agenda.


It’s a sad state of affairs, and I for one, am seriously concerned about the youth of our country.
http://www.youngcons.com/new-pool-fight ... ok-racist/
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Re: The War Against Law Enforcement and Authority

Postby Happy Mom » Sat Jun 20, 2015 3:59 pm

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ChristianChristensen
‏@ChrChristensen
One of these guys killed 9 people. One of these guys was selling single cigarettes. #DylannRoof #EricGarner


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Re: The War Against Law Enforcement and Authority

Postby Happy Mom » Sat Jun 27, 2015 7:31 pm

Freddie Gray Autopsy Report Deals Blow to Murder Charges

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Mosby announces charges in the Gray case on May 1. (Andrew Burton/Getty by ANDREW C. MCCARTHY June 24, 2015 8:30 PM

Baltimore prosecutor Marilyn Mosby has withheld the autopsy report on Freddie Gray from defense counsel and the public for nearly two months. It is the report on which she relied to file murder and other charges against six police officers, even though the investigation into Mr. Gray’s death was not close to being complete. Now, just two days before Friday’s court deadline for the state to disclose the report to the defense, it has been leaked to the Baltimore Sun. The Sun’s story makes it easier to understand why Ms. Mosby wanted the autopsy kept under wraps. It raises additional disturbing questions about her case — a case in which she has already had to dismiss false-imprisonment charges, the untenable nature of which I explained when Mosby filed them. It turns out that Mr. Gray “tested positive for opiates and cannabinoid.” Moreover, he carried on wildly when initially placed in the police van. It had previously been widely reported that he was not belted into his seat, a violation of recently adopted Baltimore police policy that Mosby dubiously makes the plinth of her case. The Sun’s latest dispatch, however, indicates that Gray was making matters difficult for the police: “yelling and banging, ‘causing the van to rock,’ the autopsy noted.” The van made several stops during its 45-minute ride. At the second one, six minutes after the arrest, Gray was reportedly “still yelling and shaking the van.” Police thus removed him and placed him in leg restraints — ankle cuffs, to go along with the handcuffs that had already been applied. Gray was “then slid onto the floor of the van, belly down and head first,” according to the autopsy report, which gingerly adds that he was, at that point, “still verbally and physically active.” It’s now easier to understand why Mosby wanted the autopsy kept under wraps: It raises additional disturbing questions about her case. It was after this, the medical examiner concluded, that Gray suffered a severe spinal injury (which led to his death, a week later). At some undetermined point during the van’s journey, he was catapulted by the force of its deceleration and crashed into the interior. The injury is likened to a “shallow-water diving accident.”


Significantly, however, the medical examiner, Carol H. Allan, surmised that Gray probably could not have sustained his severe injuries if he’d remained in the prone position the police had put him in. The Sun report elaborates: While it’s possible Gray was hurt while lying on the floor and moving back and forth, Allan determined that his body likely couldn’t have moved in that position with enough force to cause his injuries. Allan surmised that Gray could have gotten to his feet using the bench and opposite wall. With his hands and ankles restrained, and unable to see out of the van and anticipate turns, she said, he was at a high risk for an unsupported fall. Thus, the most likely scenario is that Gray, under the influence of narcotics and in the course of making his transport difficult for the arresting officers, elected on his own to get to his feet despite the difficulty of doing so. Under circumstances where his arms and legs were restrained, Gray’s decision to change the position the police had put him in rendered him vulnerable to the “high-energy” injury he sustained. This is not to say the police should not have done a better job of securing Gray. But we are not talking here about whether they violated procedure and prudence. We are talking about whether their conduct warrants prosecution for murder and lesser forms of culpable homicide. The driver of the van, Officer Caesar R. Goodson Jr., is charged with depraved-heart murder in the second degree. In his case, the question is whether he acted with such wanton indifference to Gray’s life that his conduct should be considered just as blameworthy as if he had fully intended to kill Gray. As one Maryland court has instructed: This highly blameworthy state of mind is not one of mere negligence. It is not merely one even of gross criminal negligence. It involves rather the deliberate perpetration of a knowingly dangerous act with reckless and wanton unconcern and indifference as to whether anyone is harmed or not. The common law treats such a state of mind as just as blameworthy, just as antisocial and, therefore, just as truly murderous as the specific intents to kill and harm. It is blatant overreach, on the facts spelled out in the autopsy report, to describe Goodson’s conduct as the “depraved heart” equivalent of willfully murdering Freddie Gray. Also suspect are Mosby’s charges of involuntary manslaughter against Goodson and three other cops — Lieutenant Brian W. Rice, Sergeant Alicia D. White, and Officer William F. Porter. Involuntary manslaughter is the unintentional killing of another by a negligent act, which can include the failure to perform a legal duty. Obviously, the prosecutor’s claim that Goodson acted negligently contradicts her claim, in the murder charge, that he acted with a degree of depravity functionally equivalent to intentional killing. That aside, Mosby’s manslaughter case hinges on two police omissions: the failures to secure Gray in a seatbelt and to get him sufficiently prompt medical attention. Gray was arrested at about 8:40 a.m. on April 12, after he’d fled in a high-crime area upon making eye contact with Lieutenant Rice. It was Rice who ordered Goodson to take Gray to the Baltimore Central Booking and Intake Center. It was also at Rice’s direction that the recalcitrant Gray was placed in leg restraints and belly down during the van’s afore-described second stop, shortly after the arrest. To repeat, the autopsy indicates that Gray would not have sustained his fatal injuries if he had remained as Rice had positioned him; nevertheless, Rice is charged with manslaughter. GET FREE EXCLUSIVE NR CONTENT Police stopped three additional times to monitor Gray during the van ride. Before considering them, it is worth noting that checking on a prisoner repeatedly and attempting (however insufficiently) to assist him are hardly consistent with Mosby’s suggestion that the cops were flippant about his condition. The medical examiner believes the severe injury — after Gray stood up on his own — occurred sometime after the second but before the fourth stop. On the third stop, Goodson merely eyeballed the back of the van from the outside, taking no further action. A few minutes later, he made the fourth stop, during which he again checked Gray. This time, he called for assistance. It arrived in the form of Officer Porter. Though he is charged with homicide, this marks Porter’s first appearance in the case: He had no involvement in the arrest, and did not participate in the positioning of Gray prior to Gray’s injury. The prisoner was apparently lying on the floor, complaining about difficulty breathing and moving. He asked for a doctor, but Porter instead helped him up and seated him on the rear compartment’s bench, enabling Goodson to continue the ride. For that decision, Porter is charged with manslaughter — even though Gray was communicative and able to move with assistance; even though Porter may have concluded (perhaps reasonably, even if incorrectly) that it made more sense to have the van take Gray the short remaining distance to Central Booking, where any necessary help would be available, than to wait for a medic. It was after this stop that a radio call went out for another arrestee to be picked up nearby. The proof of Goodson’s purported depravity includes his decision to respond to that call, because it necessarily delayed by a few minutes the provision of medical attention to Gray. That brings us to the final stop, where manslaughter defendant White makes her first appearance in the case. In the course of loading the additional prisoner into the van, Sergeant White and other officers noticed Gray slumped against the bench and appearing “lethargic with minimal responses to direct questions.” White — who, like Goodson, is black — is apparently charged with manslaughter, despite her dearth of participation in the police interaction with Gray, because she allowed the van to continue the short remaining distance to Central Booking, rather than stopping to summon a medic. The Sun’s account does not tell us whether it would have taken less time for a medic to get to the scene than for the van to meet a medic at Central Booking — much less whether the few minutes lost, if any, would have made any difference at that point.
That, in any event, is the sum total of Mosby’s allegation that White caused Gray’s death. Causation is not a small matter. Prosecutors have to prove it beyond a reasonable doubt in a homicide case. If Gray’s own actions, particularly those in contravention of what the police were trying to get him to do, materially contributed to his severe injury or broke any chain of causation attributable to the police conduct, the homicide case collapses. Put another way, Ms. Mosby’s case appears to be very thin . . . and that’s before experienced defense lawyers have even begun to pick it apart. — Andrew C. McCarthy is a policy fellow at the National Review Institute. His latest book is Faithless Execution: Building the Political Case for Obama’s Impeachment.

Read more at: http://www.nationalreview.com/article/4 ... c-mccarthy

Read more at: http://www.nationalreview.com/article/4 ... c-mccarthy
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Re: The War Against Law Enforcement and Authority

Postby Happy Mom » Tue Jul 07, 2015 9:10 am

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Re: The War Against Law Enforcement and Authority

Postby Happy Mom » Tue Sep 01, 2015 11:25 am

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Re: The War Against Law Enforcement and Authority

Postby Happy Mom » Thu Sep 03, 2015 8:04 am

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Re: The War Against Law Enforcement and Authority

Postby Happy Mom » Thu Sep 03, 2015 8:32 am

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Re: The War Against Law Enforcement and Authority

Postby Happy Mom » Thu Sep 03, 2015 9:27 am

Another Police Officer Murdered. Is It Time To Classify Black Lives Matter As A Hate Group?
A.C. SpollenLong Island, NY

The Journal by IJReview is an opinion platform and any opinions or information put forth by contributors are exclusive to them and do not represent IJReview.


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Shortly after radioing in that he was pursuing three suspects, a Chicago police officer was was shot and killed in the suburb of Fox Lake:

According to CBS Chicago:

A manhunt was underway in far north suburban Fox Lake, after a police officer was shot and killed during a traffic stop.


Lake County Major Crimes Task Force Cmdr. George Filenko said an officer was shot Tuesday morning near Rollins Road and Route 59. Sources said the officer has died, although police officials have yet to comment publicly on the officer’s condition.

Lake County Sheriff’s Det. Chris Covelli said, around 7:50 a.m., the officer radioed he was pursuing three suspects, after looking into their “suspicious activity.” Police lost radio contact with the officer, who was later found with a gunshot wound.
Officers responding to the scene assisted the officer, who may have been stripped of his weapon and other gear, and later died at the scene. Currently three suspects – two white males and a black male – are at large and law enforcement are conducting a ground and air search.

Schools in the area were placed on lockdown:

Grant Community High School in Fox Lake and St. Bede School in neighboring Ingleside were placed on lockdown at the request of Fox Lake Police as police search for the suspects.

Gavin School District 57 said Gavin South Middle School and Gavin Central Elementary School — both in Ingleside — were on soft lockdown. McHenry School District 15 said all of its schools — six elementary schools and two high schools — also were on soft lockdown due to the manhunt.
This marks the 83rd law enforcement officer to have died in the line of duty so far in 2015, the 4th to have been shot and killed in the past 8 days. 83 police officers have lost their lives doing nothing more than going to work to support their families.

All the while, Black Lives Matter chants “Pigs in a blanket, fry ’em like bacon!” and “What do we want? Dead cops! When do we want them? Now!” yet they refuse to take responsibility that perhaps their rhetoric may somehow be linked.

Why is it that when a civilian is killed by a police officer the public outrage is enormous? Black Lives Matter is out en masse, setting fire to buildings and rioting for days, but when an innocent police officer is murdered by a criminal people rarely bother to comment.


Then again, there are those on the left that will go so far as to say this is what justice looks like:

https://twitter.com/jaxiwest/status/637742926655676416

It’s about time that people stop glorifying criminals and criminal behavior. At some point people are going to have to take responsibility for themselves.

Elizabeth Hasselbeck and Kevin Jackson are correct: Black Lives Matter should be classified as a hate group.


http://journal.ijreview.com/2015/09/247 ... m=ijreview
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