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SB(PD)Undercover Blog - Read It Often!

Re: SB(PD)Undercover Blog - Read It Often!

Postby bubblyone » Mon Aug 24, 2015 8:21 am

Please be advised that if you curse me out, I will not go to your employer and wine or cry. I might have words with you, but would not get you fired for it...I can hold my own with the best of them, SBPD or otherwise. I have had jobs dealing with the public...it does make you want to curse!
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Re: SB(PD)Undercover Blog - Read It Often!

Postby saywatanayo » Fri Sep 18, 2015 10:58 am

STAND BY.....WAIT FOR IT.......
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Re: SB(PD)Undercover Blog - Read It Often!

Postby bubblyone » Fri Sep 18, 2015 12:12 pm

Yes, waiting...how about a whisper in "my ear"? I promise not to tell anyone...
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Re: SB(PD)Undercover Blog - Read It Often!

Postby Happy Mom » Wed Sep 23, 2015 8:16 pm

Eagle Driver wrote:BW:

I an acquaintance of Mr. Beaty. I can tell you he was a paramedic before becoming a police officer. I can also tell you he has a mind like a steel trap. He never forgets a bad guy. But..... I can also tell you that during his career on the police department, he's done some incredibly stupid things. I won't tell stories behind his back so we'll just leave it at that.

As for the FOP President's position.....that was a farst . Scott Ruszkowski wanted out as the president because he knew he would never make chief as long as he was in that position. So..... He put Dave there. And again, I'll leave it at that.

As for playing Santa... A very cool thing. And you are correct. His time, his money (or a bigger portion of it)

Dave could have been one of the best on the Police Department .... He just had a tiny attitude problem that he needed to get over.. It's too bad he lost his job. And more, it's too bad yet another South Bend Police Officer has made their way into the eyes of the press.... I hope someday it all stops. We have a very good police department. But the only thing most of the public gets to see and hear is the bad parts ,,,,,,



Fired South Bend officer files wrongful termination lawsuit


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A former South Bend Police officer has filed a lawsuit against the city, alleging wrongful termination.

On May 5, South Bend Police Chief Ron Teachman filed disciplinary charges against Detective Sgt. Dave Beaty for alleged violations of general conduct.

The South Bend Public Safety Board ruled on August 19 that Beaty violated the department's general order and should be terminated.

Beaty's lawsuit alleges the decision was "arbitrary, capricious and not supported by substantial evidence." He added that the punishment for the violations is excessive.

Beaty claimed that the SBPD bundled the accusations together and didn't address each of them as they arose. In the lawsuit, he asks that the court reverse the board's decision to terminate him and award full back pay.

In documents submitted to the Board of Public Safety, Teachman documented several incidents over the course of Beaty's tenure with the South Bend Police Department.

According to the documents, on Nov. 1, 2014, Beaty left his patrol car unlocked while he went inside a bar where he was employed. A laptop was stolen from the car in the process. Officers are not allowed to work directly or indirectly inside a building or enclosed area where alcoholic beverages are sold and consumed on the premises. Beaty was responsible for properly securing his assigned vehicle and equipment before leaving them unattended.

On Dec. 2, 2014, the report says Beaty initially falsely reported how damage to his patrol car happened, blaming the damage on an unknown person. His story changed, saying he collided with a "yellow post" on Nov. 26, 2014.

The next submission in the report was in reference to the derogatory comments made towards a waitress. The report says, on Oct. 16, 2014, Beaty "made course [sic], profane, and degrading, comments to a member of the wait staff at P&G Restaurant in South Bend, Ind." The report goes on to say officers shall not commit any acts which constitute violation of any of the rules, regulations, directives or orders of the department and that officers should conduct themselves on and off duty in such a manner as to reflect most favorably on the department.

The report goes on to name two other infractions in 2014 that Beaty was a part of. It also lists eight acts of misconduct during his 22-year career ranging from 1993 to 2010, and also mentions 12 citizen and administrative complaints with each requiring an independent investigation.
http://www.wndu.com/home/headlines/Fire ... 47321.html
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Re: SB(PD)Undercover Blog - Read It Often!

Postby Happy Mom » Thu Sep 24, 2015 6:29 am

Fired South Bend police officer sues city


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Fired South Bend police officer sues city
Mike Hartman
David Beaty
Posted: Thursday, September 24, 2015 6:00 am | Updated: 6:07 am, Thu Sep 24, 2015.
By Erin Blasko South Bend Tribune

SOUTH BEND — A former city police officer fired for not properly reporting damage to his police vehicle, among other alleged offenses, is suing the city for wrongful termination.
In a lawsuit filed Sept. 16, David Beaty, a former sergeant, alleges the Board of Public Safety acted in an “arbitrary” and “capricious” manner when it fired him.
The lawsuit alleges the board acted without substantial evidence and in violation of statutory, legal, procedural and constitutional principles of due process.
And it describes the decision to fire Beaty as “excessive” according to department policies, rules and regulations and standard operating procedures.
The lawsuit seeks a reversal of the board’s decision along with full back pay and “all other (benefits) of employment wrongfully withheld.”
At the recommendation of Police Chief Ron Teachman, the board fired Beaty on Aug. 19 for alleged violations of the police department duty manual and general orders in late 2014 and early 2015.
Among other things, Beaty allegedly failed to secure his police vehicle and properly report damage to the vehicle; made crude remarks to a waitress; ignored orders; and failed to report for overtime duty.
City spokesperson Kara Kelly declined to comment on the lawsuit Wednesday consistent with city policy concerning pending litigation.
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http://www.southbendtribune.com/news/lo ... de489.html
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Re: SB(PD)Undercover Blog - Read It Often!

Postby Happy Mom » Sun Feb 21, 2016 9:31 pm

South Bend pays $3.4 million in public safety overtime
Police, fire departments: It's cheaper than more hiring



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South Bend pays $3.4 million in public safety overtime
South Bend Police Lt. Eugene Eyster takes a photograph of a car involved in an accident in this file photo. About a third of Eyster’s pay in 2015 came from overtime. Tribune File Photo/GREG SWIERCZ



Top earners
More than 10 percent of the city’s total public safety budget for wages goes to overtime. At least three South Bend firefighters and two South Bend police officers earned more than $30,000 in overtime last year. Earnings are through mid-December.
Fire
Scott Chlebowski: $35,237.70
Robert Krizmanich: $32,961.05
William Fox: $31,192.07
Police
Ronald Glon: $34,304.58
Eugene Eyster: $30,160.21
Among the city’s 90-member public safety workers, 20 earned between $15,000 and $20,000; six earned between $20,000 and $25,000; two earned between $25,000 and $30,000; and five earned more than $30,000.
Related Documents
Public safety cost


Posted: Sunday, February 21, 2016 5:00 am | Updated: 5:25 am, Sun Feb 21, 2016.
By Erin Blasko South Bend Tribune
As coordinator of special events for South Bend police, Lt. Gene Eyster often works after hours, planning and executing security and traffic control for events such as the Sunburst races or West Side Memorial Day Parade.
In fact, Eyster, who oversees the honor guard and is part of the critical incident and fatal alcohol crash teams as well, worked more than 700 hours of overtime last year, earning $30,000 on top of his regular salary of $59,400.
“I wear a lot of hats. In addition to that, I don’t have any family restrictions, I’m single. So I have the flexibility of being available for a lot of stuff,” Eyster said.
Fire inspector Robert Krizmanich logged more than 1,000 hours, most of it as a standby paramedic at University of Notre Dame sporting events.
The result: total wages of more than $91,000 — $15,000 short of the mayor’s salary — including more than $33,000 in overtime.
Krizmanich did not respond to multiple requests for comment.
The issue of overtime spending surfaced in December, when the fire department requested an additional $420,000 for unanticipated overtime expenses for the year.
The Common Council approved the request in December.
But while overtime spending has increased in recent years, public safety chiefs say paying it is still more cost effective than adding public safety personnel. And both employees and their managers say the overtime burden isn't hurting how police and firefighters respond to calls.
Still, city officials are looking at ways to control the spending, such as new fees for security and traffic control at special events. Said Mayor Pete Buttigieg, “I think the (police and fire) chiefs have done very good work to hold the line on overtime spending … but it is something I want to continue to review to see if there are ways to continue to gain efficiencies.”
‘It’s a necessity’
While few first responders work as much overtime as Eyster or Krizmanich, records show no fewer than 90 police officers and firefighters, including emergency medical personnel, earned at least $10,000 in overtime last year.
Taking into account all public safety personnel, the city spent more than $3.4 million on overtime in 2015, including more than $1.8 million on police and more than $1.5 million on fire.
And while officials describe overtime spending as unavoidable, records show it has increased by more than 23 percent here since 2010, to a level considerably higher than in other places in the state.
Records show South Bend spent $6,754 per responder on overtime last year, compared with $6,138 per responder for Fort Wayne and $4,565 per responder for Mishawaka.
Evansville spent just $2,298 per responder, partly because the fire department awards compensation time instead of overtime once its overtime budget is spent.
At the same time, a portion of what South Bend spends on overtime is reimbursed each year by outside agencies or institutions such as the Department of Housing and Urban Development.
Notre Dame, for example, pays about $120,000 per year for standby ambulance service at sporting events, including football and basketball games, per NCAA rules.
Altogether, about $300,000 in public safety overtime costs were reimbursed last year, records show.
While the overtime budget is significant, “It’s important … that everyone understand that it’s a necessity,” Fire Chief Stephen Cox said. “It’s not like a lot of other jobs.”
What’s more, because of benefits and other expenses related to full-time employment, paying overtime typically is cheaper than hiring additional personnel, officials say.
For example, having existing officers work 40 hours as overtime amounts to a savings of about $2,000 per year over hiring a new police officer for those same hours, according to information provided by the police department.
And that doesn’t include the upfront cost to recruit and equip the new officer with a car, firearm and uniform, which runs about $23,000.
Policy plays a part
Public safety personnel accrue overtime for a number of reasons, including education and training, security and traffic control, special patrols and “recall.”
Recall is when staffing levels fall below minimum requirements for a particular shift and off-duty personnel have to be “recalled” to duty at time-and-a-half.
On the police side, staffing shortages have factored into recall in recent years, FOP President Sgt. Dan Demler said, noting the department currently is down about 16 sworn officers.
“Finding quality candidates is hard,” Demler said. “And you’ve got to look at the national picture right now too: law enforcement is getting attacked left and right, so you don’t have quality people wanting to come out in the first place.”
In the case of both police and fire, overtime is governed by union contracts that outline safe staffing levels and minimum compensation for overtime work.
Both police and fire personnel receive a minimum of two hours of overtime for responding to recall or off-duty orders to appear in court.
For police, the minimum jumps to four hours if the officer is otherwise scheduled to be off that day.
Officials say the reason some responders work more overtime than others is because they head special units, possess special skills, or simply volunteer more often for the work.
“These guys truly want to work,” said Capt. Robert Hammer, a spokesman for South Bend Police.
Recalled Demler, the FOP president, “When I got on 24 years ago … I could work four hours of overtime every single day if I wanted to. It’s just the way it is, it’s always there if guys want it.”
And “guys” want it for different reasons, Eyster said.
“The younger ones do it to supplement income; guys in middle age do it out of necessity, because at that point their children are at the age that it’s a little costly; and older guys do it out of allegiance and love of the job,” Eyster said.
What about the stress?
As for how much overtime is too much, it depends on the individual, officials say. “Each person has a threshold as to what they can bodily handle,” Cox said.
Said Buttigieg, “If an employee is willing to go the extra mile for the city, I’m happy to see them compensated accordingly, provided it doesn’t impact their readiness.”
To that end, officials do monitor individuals who work lots of overtime for signs of stress or fatigue, said Police Chief Scott Ruszkowski said.
“We don’t want them to do something stupid because they’re too tired or something,” he said.
This is spelled out in the police contract, which states, “Every effort shall be taken to ensure that no officer … works so much as to become vulnerable to stress and fatigue.”
Citing the toll of South Bend 150 and related events, Eyster nearly reached that point last year, he said.
“Last year, physically, it was draining. I was working myself to the point where I was physically ready to collapse. It was just way too much,” he said.
The capper: a fatal accident at 3 a.m. on Christmas Day.
“I lost Christmas Day with my family while trying to find a resolution for someone else’s,” Eyster said. “You can’t put a price on that … Sometimes it’s just not worth the money.”
Eyster said he has cut back on overtime this year as a result. “I can’t continue to do this; it’s not fair to the public and it’s not fair to me,” he said.
To accommodate, the department has assigned two officers to assist him.
More broadly, officials monitor time off to limit overtime, and encourage physical fitness and wellness to reduce unanticipated absences due to injury or illness.
The police department, meanwhile, is considering ways to reduce court overtime, and a fee for security and traffic control for special events.
The purpose of the fee is to combat the flood of requests the department receives for such services, which it feels obligated to provide.
“I think that’s a measure that could help us get a handle on overtime costs,” Buttigieg said.
Added Eyster, “We had to come up with some system … We just can’t do everything.”
eblasko@sbtinfo.com
574-235-6187
@ErinBlasko

http://www.southbendtribune.com/news/pu ... cdf01.html
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Re: SB(PD)Undercover Blog - Read It Often!

Postby bob_rx2000 » Mon Feb 22, 2016 7:53 am

It seems to me that there are a couple of clear observations...

First, a lieutenant makes <$60k? I have no problem with the notion of some fairly significant salary increases being passed around to the whole department. It sounds as though everyone is, ahem, underpaid. Police and firemen are people I have no problem paying well. We expect an enormous amount from them and paying them a good salary and benefits seems little enough in return.

Second, when you're spending 10% of your whole budget on overtime, that is a clear indicator that you need more staff. Hire a few more new cops.
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Re: SB(PD)Undercover Blog - Read It Often!

Postby st michael jr » Wed Feb 24, 2016 3:03 pm

bob_rx2000 wrote:It seems to me that there are a couple of clear observations...

First, a lieutenant makes <$60k? I have no problem with the notion of some fairly significant salary increases being passed around to the whole department. It sounds as though everyone is, ahem, underpaid. Police and firemen are people I have no problem paying well. We expect an enormous amount from them and paying them a good salary and benefits seems little enough in return.

Second, when you're spending 10% of your whole budget on overtime, that is a clear indicator that you need more staff. Hire a few more new cops.



Unfortunately, it isn't that easy. It is hard t hire officers no matter where you are. I heard other officers at a training recently talking about how they were down 15 officers and can't find applicants.
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Re: SB(PD)Undercover Blog - Read It Often!

Postby bdcbbq » Thu Feb 25, 2016 11:02 am

st michael jr wrote:
bob_rx2000 wrote:It seems to me that there are a couple of clear observations...

First, a lieutenant makes <$60k? I have no problem with the notion of some fairly significant salary increases being passed around to the whole department. It sounds as though everyone is, ahem, underpaid. Police and firemen are people I have no problem paying well. We expect an enormous amount from them and paying them a good salary and benefits seems little enough in return.

Second, when you're spending 10% of your whole budget on overtime, that is a clear indicator that you need more staff. Hire a few more new cops.



Unfortunately, it isn't that easy. It is hard t hire officers no matter where you are. I heard other officers at a training recently talking about how they were down 15 officers and can't find applicants.


Its bad when you can't even get applicants to apply that aren't qualified. It will get worse if Hillary or Bernie gets elected. No telling what kind of crap Obama will stir up once he's out of office. I can see him grabbing the race card a la Al and Jesse.
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Re: SB(PD)Undercover Blog - Read It Often!

Postby Happy Mom » Sun Mar 20, 2016 8:01 am

South Bend cop who claimed sex discrimination faces suspension


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JoyPhillips.jpg
photo provided
joy Phillips Photo Provided
Posted: Friday, March 18, 2016 6:00 am | Updated: 7:13 pm, Fri Mar 18, 2016.
CHRISTIAN SHECKLER South Bend Tribune csheckler@sbtinfo.com

SOUTH BEND — A female South Bend police officer who is suing the city and its former police chief for alleged sex discrimination could be suspended for more than 50 days after officials charged her with an array of policy violations.

The disciplinary charges, which were filed Wednesday with the city Board of Public Safety, came three months after officer Joy Phillips filed a federal lawsuit claiming the South Bend Police Department and former chief Ron Teachman denied her promotions in favor of men, ignored sexist behavior toward her and punished her after she reported alleged discrimination.
In all, Police Chief Scott Ruszkowski has accused Phillips of five separate violations that, if upheld by the safety board, would add up to a 54-day suspension without pay.
In the charges, Ruszkowski alleged Phillips filed reports that included false or incomplete information, ignored instructions from superiors on at least two occasions and went around the chain of command to involve herself in negotiations during a SWAT standoff to which she was not called.
Ruszkowski told the Board of Public Safety Wednesday morning that Phillips indicated she would request a hearing before the panel to contest the disciplinary action.

The Tribune requested copies of the disciplinary charges Monday, and again at the Wednesday meeting, but the city did not provide the documents until late Wednesday afternoon. The Tribune also has requested records of any previous disciplinary action in Phillips' personnel file.
In her lawsuit filed in December against the city and former police chief, Phillips, who became a South Bend police officer in 1999, described herself as an "exemplary" officer who has won numerous commendations — an assertion the city denied in its response to the suit.
In the suit, Phillips claimed she applied for a promotion to the rank of sergeant on three separate occasions. Most recently, she applied for one of three open positions but claimed she was passed over for male officers with less experience and histories of "serious disciplinary violations."
Phillips claimed she was subjected to demeaning behavior and sexually charged language, yet superiors did nothing about her complaints. In one case, she said, officials began an internal affairs investigation against her for allegedly defaming a fellow officer after she complained of unwanted sexual advances.
She also filed discrimination complaints with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission in October and December 2014. After the October 2014 complaint, she claimed in the suit, Teachman removed her from command of the hostage negotiation team and replaced her with a male officer.
http://www.southbendtribune.com/news/pu ... 5e717.html
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